A Very Short History of Lithuania

One of the reasons behind my move to Lithuania was that it is a perfect case study of 20th century European history, with its independence between the two World Wars, then the occupation by the Soviet Union, by Nazi Germany, by the Soviet Union again, one of the main killing fields of the Holocaust and finally independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.

When I checked the ticket prices for the buses in Vilnius, I came across the following price list. If you read through some of the categories of persons who receive a discount, you will get a very short history of Lithuania in the 20th century.

PASSENGERS Type of tickets and price in litas
single tickets nominal monthly tickets
at kiosk in trolleybus and bus to go by trolleybus to go by bus to go by trolleybus and bus
1. Students, pupils 1,00 1,25 17,00 17,00 22,00
2. Pensioners up to 80 years old 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
3. People with accepted partial perfomance (partly disabled) 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
4. People who were identified as invalid of cat. II till 2005 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
5. Participants of resistance to 1940-1990 occupations – military volunteers under 70 years of age and participants of fights for liberation 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
6. Persons who have suffered from 1939-1990 occupations – political prisoners and exiles and former prisoners of ghettos, concentration camps and other types of suppression camps 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
7. Defenders of independence of the Republic of Lithuania who have become disabled due to Soviet Union aggression during January 11-13, 1991 and at later times 1,00 1,25 42,50 42,50 55,00
8. Family members of the perished defenders of independence of the Republic of Lithuania who have suffered from Soviet Union aggression during January 11-13, 1991 and at later times 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
9. Persons with a disability rate, or the recognition of disabled persons 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
10. Persons who are ill with diseases included in the list drawn-up by the Ministry of Health and whose treatment constantly requires haemodialysis and to their escort (one escort for one person) 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
11. Participants of resistance to 1940-1990 occupations – military volunteers 70 years of age and older 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
12. Protectors of Lithuania independency, injured during 1991 January 11-13 and afters, with accepted partial perfomance (partly disabled) and reached the age of old-age pension 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
13. Pensioners over 80 years old 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
14. People who were identified as children invalid or invalids of cat. I till 2005 0,40 - 17,00 17,00 22,00
15. All other persons (no discount) only working days 2,00 2,50 75,00 75,00 100,00
working days and weekends 85,00 85,00 110,00

More profound articles about aspects of Lithuania’s history will follow. Hopefully.

(C) for the photo: Bjørn Giesenbauer

About Andreas Moser

Travelling the world and writing about it. I have degrees in law and philosophy, but I'd much rather be a journalist, a spy or a hobo.
This entry was posted in Europe, History, Lithuania. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to A Very Short History of Lithuania

  1. Interesting that they would go through the work of separately identifying the various resistance/defence groups, then charge them the exact same fare. I assume there are other cases, where the different categories would see different prices? (That’s sort of a rhetorical question – you can answer it through a later post.)
    Is there any obvious favourite manufacturer of cars or buses, or is it just a typical urban hodgepodge?

  2. FriendlyNeighborhoodWikipedian says:

    @John Erickson: Wikipedia to the rescue: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolleybuses_in_Vilnius

    • Well, thank you, and shame on me, I should’ve known better – considering I have eight Wiki tabs open right now! (It’s the easiest way to compare different makes of WW2 Italian fighters. Take it from a history geek! :D )

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